George Soros: Self-Made Billionaire and Philanthropist

One of the biggest philanthropists in the world, George Soros has given away almost 12 billion dollars. He has helped fund individuals and organizations fighting freedom of expression and discrimination. His money has helped those often marginalized by society around the world, like LGBTQ people, Europe’s Roma people, and sex workers.

George Soros knows about the harmful effects of discrimination from firsthand experience. Growing up in Hungary, he and his Jewish family survived the Nazie occupation in 1944 and 1945, which resulted in 500,000 Hungarian Jews murdered. Soros was only a teenager at the time. He and his family survived by creating false identification papers for themselves and for other Jewish families. Even when he was being oppressed himself, Soros was helping others. Learn more about his profile at businessinsider.com.

Soros went to London in 1947 where he worked two part-time jobs to pay for a degree at the London School of Economics. In 1956, he moved to the United States to enter the world of finance. He worked at several Wall Street brokerage firms before 1973.

In 1973, Soros launched his own hedge fund and became one of the most successful hedge fund managers in United States history. He is the 21st richest person in the world with an estimated net worth of 26 billion.

He founded the Open Society Foundations, a network of foundations, projects, and partners in over 100 countries.

In 1976, Soros started giving scholarships to black South Africans. After the Berlin Wall fell, he created the Central European University, which focused on critical thinking, a novel idea in most former Soviet universities.

Read more: https://www.project-syndicate.org/columnist/george-soros

Soros was also one of the earliest critics of America’s war on drugs, and help started the medical marijuana movement. He was also an activist supporting same-sex marriage.

Even now, Soros still has an active role in the Open Society Foundation. He still supports those fighting against discrimination and travels to advocate on behalf of the Open Society Foundation, and the “lost causes” they help. Read his profile at Washington Times.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *